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Elizabeth Brundage: “Things Seen and Heard”

The Netflix trailer is out for for Things Heard & Seen based on Elizabeth Brundage’s fabulously spooky novel All Things Cease to Appear.
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Wally Lamb: I Know This Much Is True

Mark Ruffalo keeps marching on! He won the SAG Award for Best Actor in a miniseries for I Know This Much Is True, and gave author Wally Lamb a shout-out for his novel. LCLA represents this book and we are thrilled that Mark singles out Wally, as well as calls attention to mental health issues. Congrats Wally & Mark!
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Annalee Newitz: Four Lost Cities

Annalee Newitz, author of Four Lost Cities, recounts in The New York Times how the Romans’ rebuilding of Pompeii was not unlike
a major infrastructure campaign in contemporary times:
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Martin Cooper: Cutting the Cord

Terrific interview with client Martin Cooper, considered the “Father of the Cell Phone.” His book Cutting the Cord tells the story about the invention that revolutionized the world.
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Joyce Maynard: Count the Ways

Joyce Maynard, whose new novel, COUNT THE WAYS, will debut in June, has a powerful and chilling essay in Vanity Fair:
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Celia Stahr: Frida in America

Salma Hayek is reading Celia Stahr’s FRIDA IN AMERICA while she nurses her ankle!

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Elizabeth Brundage: The Vanishing Point

Congrats to Elizabeth Brundage for her Starred Booklist review of The Vanishing Point.

It gives nothing away to acknowledge that the famous photographer Rye Adler is presumed dead, though his body hasn’t been found, since the book opens with that startling news as read in the paper by Julian Ladd, who had once been Adler’s fellow student at the famous Brodsky Workshop, where they had been in love with the same young woman, Magda, a fellow student. Julian is obsessively jealous of Rye’s genius but succeeds in marrying Magda when Rye marries Simone, a poet and translator, instead. Time passes, and Magda and Julian’s son, Theo, worried about the deteriorating condition of the world, becomes a heroin addict, dropping out of college and living on the streets. The novel moves smoothly between the points of view of the five principal characters as it shifts between past and present. An ambitious, literary novel, The Vanishing Point is distinguished by its characterizations, its pervasive air of melancholy, and its beautiful style (“The sun steeps like tea in the copper dusk”). Not surprisingly, there is a great deal of thought-provoking attention given to the meaning and aesthetics of photography, and, like great photography, the novel is ultimately a work of memorable art. — Michael Cart

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Wally Lamb: I Know This Much Is True

Mark Ruffalo wins the Golden Globe for Best Actor in the TV series adaptation of our book I Know This Much Is True.
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Annalee Newitz: Four Lost Cities

Huzzah to Annalee Newitz on a glowing review of Four Lost Cities in The New York Times
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Joyce Maynard: Count the Ways

Brava on Joyce Maynard’s Starred Review from Kirkus Reviews:

Since she was once a homeless orphan, Eleanor’s chaotic, joyous family and farm mean everything to her. And then….

How much pain and loss can one person take? How can you end up evicted from a world you built yourself? How can doing the right thing backfire totally? In her 10th novel, Maynard vividly imagines a scenario that answers these questions with hard-won wisdom, patiently leading her protagonist and her readers through the valley of bitterness and isolation to what lies on the other side. When she is just 16, Eleanor’s alcoholic, self-involved parents are killed in a car crash. At boarding school, she comforts herself by creating picture books about an orphan who travels the world; these sell to a publisher, and by the time she’s a sophomore in college, she has enough money to drop out, drive into the countryside, and buy a farm. “It looked like a house where people who loved each other had lived,” she thinks. If you build it, they will come—right? Nonetheless, several years go by in solitude, and not without additional tragedy. At last, she meets Cam, the handsome, redheaded woodworker who will give her three children they both adore. But even as Eleanor revels in motherhood with every cell of her being, her glue gun, and her pie pan, she knows fate cannot be trusted. “If anything really terrible ever happened to one of our children, I couldn’t survive,” she tells her husband. Could loving her children too much be her downfall? she worries. When an accident that her husband could have prevented changes their lives, she will find out. She will find out how, in your grief, you can drive away the people you love most. And she will find out, slowly, what you can do about that. The novel bites off a lot—a Brett Kavanaugh–inspired storyline, a domestic abuse situation, a trans child, Eleanor’s career—and manages to resolve them all, in some cases a bit hastily.

Maynard creates a world rich and real enough to hold the pain she fills it with.

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Elizabeth Brundage: “Things Seen and Heard”

We’re so excited that Elizabeth Brundage’s novel All Things Cease to Appear will be debuting as a feature film on Netflix on April 30th as “Things Seen and Heard,” starring Amanda Seyfried.
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Jan Goldstein: “All That Matters”

We’re excited by the news that client Jan Goldstein’s insightful podcast, “All That Matters,” has broken through to the top 10% of podcasts world-wide (per Listen Notes). Jan presents stories that connect us all. Listen on Apple, Spotify or click here.

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Jennifer Weiner: Good in Bed

Good in Bed, our #1 New York Times bestseller by Jennifer Weiner, is being made into film by HBO!

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Tracey Davis and Dolores Barclay: My Father

MGM will be filming a biopic of our book Sammy Davis, Jr., My Father, a stirring memoir by Tracey Davis and Dolores Barclay! 

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Margot Mifflin: Looking for Miss America

So exciting to see a full-page review in the New York Times Book Review review of Margot Mifflin’s entertaining, feminist history of the Miss America Pageant, Looking for Miss America. This is the pinnacle of coverage for any book.

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Marc Bloom: AMAZING RACERS

Congratulations to Marc Bloom for winning Book of the Year for Amazing Racers from the Track and Field Writers of America!

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Wally Lamb: I Know This Much Is True

We’re seriously thrilled that Mark Ruffalo won the Emmy for his portrayal of both Birdsey twins in Wally Lamb’s extraordinary novel-into-series I Know This Much Is True. Mark’s acceptance speech was passionate, compassionate, and aptly political: 

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Daniel H. Wilson: The Blue Afternoon That Lasted Forever

Congratulations to Daniel H. Wilson, who is developing the script for his short story The Blue Afternoon That Lasted Forever for Paramount.

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Erica Heller: One Last Lunch

Moving interview with our author Erica Heller and a review of her book One Last Lunch in The Los Angeles Review of Books.

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Robert Zubrin: The Case For Mars

It’s rare to see a book garner an anniversary edition. The Case For Mars by Robert Zubrin will enjoy a 25-year anniversary edition in early 2020 (Simon & Schuster) with a new foreword by Elon Musk (the original foreword was by Arthur C. Clarke!).

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Laurie Fox: The Lost Girls

The agency is delighted to announce that filming has been completed on the adaptation of Laurie Fox’s novel The Lost Girls, a contemporary take on Wendy Darling and her descendants. Livia De Paolis, who will star, also adapted the work for film and directed it. The film will star the great Vanessa Redgrave, her daughter Joely Richardson, Iain Glen (Game of Thrones), Julian Ovenden (Downtown Abbey) and Parker Stevens (Obama in Southside With You).

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Margot Mifflin: Looking for Miss America

Thrilled to see an extensive article— and rave — in The New Yorker based entirely on Margot Mifflin’s Looking for Miss America:

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Amy Poeppel: Musical Chairs

In their “New Best Books” column, People magazine hails Amy Poeppel’s Musical Chairs as “fiercely funny”!

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Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell: NEH Grant

We’re thrilled to announce that our fashion historian-in-residence, Kimberly Chrisman Campbell, received a richly deserved NEH Public Scholars grant to write her biography, Mod Man, on instrumental fashion designer Chester Weinberg (1930–1985), a contemporary of Calvin Klein’s and Donna Karan’s (Chester was Calvin Klein’s Jeans) and, sadly, the first prominent American designer acknowledged to have succumbed to AIDS. Chrisman-Campbell’s forthcoming book this December is The Way We Wed from Running Press.

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Annalee Newitz: Best Fancast (podcast)

So confirming to see our science fiction novelist and science journalist/author Annalee Newitz bring home a Hugo Award for the second year in a row for Best Fancast (podcast), along with co-host Charlie Jane Anders:

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Margot Mifflin: Looking for Miss America

Brava to Margot Mifflin whose book Looking for Miss Americawas chosen as one of Publisher’s Weekly’s “Best Summer Reads”!

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Amy Poeppel: Musical Chairs.

Congratulations to Amy Poeppel whose Musical Chairs was chosen as one of Good Morning America’s “Top 25 Books of the Summer”!

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One Last Lunch: A Final Meal with Those Who Meant So Much to Us

We’re delighted to share early praise for One Last Lunch: A Final Meal with Those Who Meant So Much to Us edited by Erica Heller:

The death of someone near often leaves survivors wanting just one more encounter and a chance to say the unsaid, to tie up loose ends. Heller (Yossarian Slept Here, 2011) contacted friends, spouses, and children of late famous people—Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Julia Child, Paul Newman, and David Bowie among them—and asked them to imagine one last lunch with their friend or loved one. An encounter with Steve Jobs comes in the form of a comic. Norman Mailer’s daughter finds that her father has softened; Kenneth Tynan’s daughter finds him as obtuse and irascible as ever. And one writer gets stood up in his own invented lunch with Oliver Sacks! Heller herself holds court with her own difficult father and does not rewrite their history, even a little. While this book may appeal most to Boomers, imagined lunches with luminaries like the ever-enchanting Prince and the ever-on Robin Williams might just spur Gen Xers and younger “gens” to read on and learn about artistic and literary lights in this special and unique way. A delightful repast.

— Joan Curbow, Booklist

Looking For Miss America

Looking For Miss America

Praise for Margot Mifflin’s Looking For Miss America;

“A sharp and immensely entertaining look at one of our country’s most enduring—and controversial—traditions, LOOKING FOR MISS AMERICA also paints a microcosmic portrait of our past century, in unflinching and irreverent detail. With her gimlet eye and wry wit, Margot Mifflin is the perfect tour-guide on this journey through America’s fundamentals: cheesecake, capitalism, racism, sexism, ambition, and old-school, unabashed glamor. I couldn’t put it down.”

—Karen Abbott, author of New York Times bestseller The Ghosts of Eden Park

Looking For Miss America

The Lost Girls

Congratulations to the agency’s own Laurie Fox, whose second novel The Lost Girls, an exploration of the Peter Pan story from Wendy and her descendents’ point of view, has been optioned for film, starring Emma Thompson and Ellen Burstyn. Read More.

The Lost Girls

Worn On This Day

Congratulations on the publication of top fashion historian Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell’s Worn On This Day: The Clothes That Made History (Running Press). Here’s an article on the book’s entry on Marilyn Monroe’s ‘Happy Birthday, Mr. President’ dress.
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